Knitted Knockers

Knitted Knockers
Image courtesy of Ravelry.com

Knitted Knockers

Several months ago I came across a wonderful initiative called “Knitted Knockers”. As the name suggests, knitted knockers are handmade prosthetics for women who have had to undergo a mastectomy. They are soft, light-weight, fully adjustable, and can be made in a huge range of colours.

Knitted Knockers.org was founded by an amazing lady named Barbara as a result of her own experience with breast cancer. Complications with her initial surgery meant that she couldn’t follow her original treatment plan for immediate reconstruction, which meant she needed to look for an alternative interim solution.

Her doctor showed her a picture of a knitted knocker, and provided her with a pattern. A special friend was able to make one for her quite quickly (she actually made her two) and this is what she says on her website:

“It was FABULOUS! It was light, pretty, soft and fit in my own bra perfectly. I took off my jacket and knew right then that I wanted to make these available to other women going through the same situation. I thought, “what if my doctor had real knitted knockers to give to women rather than only having a photocopied picture on a sheet of paper to show them?””

Knitted Knockers
Image courtesy of Ravelry.com
Knitted Knockers
Image courtesy of Ravelry.com

I highly recommend that you visit Knitted Knockers.org and read Barbara’s story in full on the site. There is also a lovely video you can watch. Barbara has taken her idea and run with it. She is now trying to make knitted knockers available to any women who need them. Through her site she is connecting people in need with people who can donate. There are also a number of patterns available on the site, including crochet as well as knitting, which you can download.

Knitted Knockers
Image courtesy of Ravelry.com
Knitted Knockers
Image courtesy of Craftsy.com

While Barbara began her initiative in the United States, there are knitted knocker groups in many different countries. A quick internet search will allow you to find the group or organisation closest to you. I encourage you to get behind this wonderful movement and become part of an outreach which is making such a meaningful difference in the lives of so many women who are going through such a traumatic time in their lives.

 

See also: “Handcrafting To Support Charities“, “Octopuses (Octopi?) For Premature Babies“, “Two Jumpers and an Octopus“, and “Another Octopus and Some Scarves“.

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It’s Hard to Say Goodbye

It’s Hard to Say Goodbye

It’s hard to say goodbye to people we love. Recently my very special friend Heather turned 60. I designed and stitched a special cross stitch piece for her (see “The Magic of Outlining”). At the time it was very special to be able to give her such a personal gift, but I am even more thankful now that I did this for her. Heather died on the 1st of July and I attended her funeral on the 7th, along with hundreds of others whose lives had been touched by her.

Heather and I had been friends since we were 12, nearly 48 years. We went through high school together, got married and had children at around the same time, and shared a special bond. As life became busier, and we both shifted around a bit, there were often times when we did not see each other for quite a while. Each time we met up again, though, it was like we had only been apart for a week. There was a strong thread that wove through both our lives and now that thread has been broken.

I created my “Karen’s Korner” page to have somewhere on my site to share significant events or inspirational happenings. At the time I never dreamed that this would be the first thing I would be sharing with you, but somehow it seems the right thing to do. We all have a few very special people in our lives and, at various times in our lives, we all face the loss of loved ones. How we work through these times determines how we continue to live our lives.

Heather was a very special person with a wonderful gift of friendship which she shared generously with everyone around her. She was always cheerful, in spite of battling with several painful illnesses, and always eager to help people. Her family were her treasure here on earth and she loved them dearly. She was a gift to all who knew her.

After hearing all the memories people have shared about Heather, and knowing how she lived her life to the full, it is very tempting to think “I should try to be more like her and live more like her”. In some ways this might be a good thing, but something else has been becoming clearer to me over the last few days.

It is right that we should be inspired to live better by the example of someone like Heather, but it is not right that we should try to become them. Only Heather could be Heather, I am the only person who can be me, and you are the only person who can be you. The best way that we can honour the memory of the special people who have passed on from our lives is not by trying to be like them, but by striving to be the best version of ourselves that we can be.

I believe we are each unique and have been created to fulfil a role that only we can play. Heather has fulfilled her role here, and now I must strive to fulfil mine. It’s hard to say goodbye, so I choose to say farewell to my special friend until we meet again in our eternal home.